Volatile minds

I am fascinated by shapes and symmetry in nature, which is sort of what this post is about. I believe there is a creator or a programmer behind everything.

I have written several posts about British celebrity atheists the last couple of years, and they are frequently represented by Stephen Fry and Richard Dawkins. They may very well be what they claim to be, but I get the impression that far too many atheists sail with a flag of convenience. If you don’t want any questions or don’t wan’t to defend what you believe, proclaiming to be an atheist is an easy solution. No one is going to ask how you came to that conclusion.

I mentioned Stephen Fry in the other posts, especially an interview he did with an Irish TV channel. Many atheists praised his remarkably inconsiderate bluster, but although these couple of minutes told me quite a lot about Stephen Fry (I knew he was an atheist, but before this I mostly knew him as an actor), they left me with more questions than answers. This story re-surfaced this week because a man had reported Fry to the police for what he saw as blasphemous comments in this interview. The police were forced to investigate, but only got around to it now, two years later. They dropped the case of course because having an opinion, no matter how thoughtless it is, shouldn’t be illegal.

Watch Stephen Fry’s answer on You Tube.

I don’t like the tendency there is these days to attack people you disagree with. I think both Stephen Fry and whoever reported him to the police did so in this case. Media reports constantly about cases where there is a false accusation of rape or molestation. There are cases involving the Child Welfare Service where they accuse a parent, usually ther mother, of being mentally ill. This happens without a psychologist/psychiatrist or even a GP talking to the parent. There are many master suppression techniques used to stop people or simply to get revenge. I also take an interest foreign politics and international relations, and as soon as you voice an opinion some people are quick to label you a conspiracy theorist. In other words, no matter how dogmatically Stephen Fry speaks, he shouldn’t be silenced.

As for the content of his speech…. Well, that is confusing and predictable at the same time. I am sorry to say I am not the great mind and thinker I’d like to be. I tried reading a translation of Thomas Aquinas once and I’ve never been so utterly disheartened. I couldn’t understand any of it, although I was reading my own language. I can only use my limited understanding of the universe, but I believe that is enough for me.

Tbe problem most people have, and this is a very general principle you can apply to everything from religion to science to racism, is that they don’t accept conclusions that contradict what they already believe. Even scientists tend to look for evidence that supports their hypothesis, but they find it harder to accept findings that will force them to lose some of their most fundamental convictions.

Stephen Fry seems to have reached a deeper understanding of the big questions. Christians have always struggled with explaining God and the presence of evil, and there’s been many suggestions the last 2000 years. I don’t personally know that God controls everything that goes on in the universe, or that he is responsible for all the injustice and pain in the world. I don’t know that God demands us to get down on our knees to thank him either. I am mostly hopeful. To be honest, I am trying to make the best out of this life, but it would be nice with a second round without all the bs from this world.

Are you looking for proof? Aren’t we all, but what is proof? Experience is an obsolete term for the word proof, and in that sense the proof of God’s existence makes sense to me. You are not going to find anything if you expect mathematics that leaves no doubt whatsoever. The way I experience or observe and encounter the universe, and read about how scientists have encountered it, I find it very likely that the universe and our unique world was created. I don’t think it just happened.

I personally don’t think it would be a bad idea with a more Christian lifestyle. and by that I don’t mean the corrupt version that governments and political leaders have imposed on the population for a couple of thousand years. Proof is experience and what most Christians preach is nonsense to me because it’s not my experience.

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One thought on “Volatile minds

  1. Interesting consideration.
    I tend to believe that faith in God/Christ is a phenomenon that cannot fully be explained on a human level. For some, it is imperative that Christians be able to satisfactorily provide a “logical” explanation to non-believers. I fear that this can end up being an ego problem for serious theology students which is motivated mostly by a desire to not be mocked or mistreated for one’s confession of belief.
    But still, the reality is that an awareness of God’s existence and desire to know Him goes deeper than the mind’s ability to comprehend. Not everyone will accept that. And that is just the way this world seems to work.

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